Week 6 in Manufacturing News

U.S. Manufacturing Growth Continued Early in 2021; Seven Reasons Why U.S. Manufacturing is on the Rise; Budget Must Address Short and Long Term for UK Manufacturing; Our Success in Managing Covid-19, and Why it Matters When we Talk About Rebuilding Manufacturing.

U.S. Manufacturing Growth Continued Early in 2021

U.S. manufacturing continued to recover in January, a bright spot for the U.S. economy as services companies continue to struggle with the coronavirus pandemic.

Two purchasing managers surveys on manufacturing activity released Monday pointed to continued growth, adding to evidence a pickup in demand for goods is helping U.S. factories.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

Seven Reasons Why U.S. Manufacturing is on the Rise

Silicon Valley may have been built on innovation, but over the past 10 years, I believe it’s lost its edge. As an entrepreneur who came up through Y Combinator, I was encouraged to focus on dazzling venture capitalists, selling big dreams of the most popular tech. Unsurprisingly, this method can lead to multi-million dollar investments in vaporware, “Uber for Tinder” products and outright fraud.

Source: Forbes

Budget Must Address Short and Long Term for UK Manufacturing

UK manufacturers are calling on the government to use the budget as a starting point to set out a major long term industrial and economic strategy.

The call by Make UK comes on the back of its latest Manufacturing Monitor tracking survey which shows that companies are preparing for a long-haul recovery from the current pandemic.

Make UK believes that while further short term tactical measures will be needed in the budget to help support companies through this year, there is an urgent need to develop a longer-term strategic vision that sets out how the UK can prosper.

Source: Production Engineering Solutions

Our Success in Managing Covid-19, and Why it Matters When we Talk About Rebuilding Manufacturing

Prior to COVID-19 hitting the global economy in December 2019, Australia had already found itself in the middle of a trade dispute between the two superpowers: the USA, the long term ally on many fronts such as security and investment, and China, unstoppable rising power in Asia and the largest trade partner of Australia, imposing trade sanctions on each other’s goods and services due to the significant deficit worth of $419bn USD in 2018.

The wishful thinking from Australian governments was that the Australian economy would remain stable during these heightened tensions, given the surplus announced by the treasurer, and the belief that somehow cooler heads would prevail.

Source: AuManufacturing